Tour Madrid with MadridMan! BACK TO
MadridMan.com!
Sponsored Links

Page 140 of 151 < 1 2 138 139 140 141 142 150 151 >
Topic Options
#95794 - 03/06/18 02:25 AM Re: My Travels in North East Scotland [Re: robbieroy]
robbieroy Online   content
Executive Member

Registered: 04/28/04
Posts: 2067
Loc: Scotland
I spent four years studying at Aberdeen University in Old Aberdeen and ten years lecturing there. In all that time I did not realise the hidden history of it.

The big picture


We are going to explore the main thoroughfare of Old Aberdeen, from High Street, through College Bounds to the Spital. Along this route we will find many interesting buildings with interesting histories...

First up, High Street


At the north end of the High Street sits the Townhouse


This Georgian building was designed by George Jaffray
in 1788.
At first it incorporated a Grammar School, an
English School and a hall for the use of different societies
and the Incorporated Trades of Old Aberdeen.
It was in part funded by the Masons, who until recently retained the use of the attic to themselves.


Behind the large timber doors was kept the handcart used
for picking up drunks from the streets and transporting them
back to the cells to sleep it off. You can see a vent at the
side of the building, which was a source of light and air into
the two police cells at the rear.


The coat of arms on the east side of the building are those of the kings of Scotland with an imperial crown and are of unknown origin and date.




The Townhouse has recently undergone restoration work,
carried out by the University of Aberdeen, with support from
the Heritage Lottery Fund and Aberdeen City Council.


Today it is the visitor gateway to the University and its campus.


The Mercat Cross...




Edited by robbieroy (03/06/18 02:41 AM)
_________________________
RR


Top
#95795 - 03/07/18 02:52 AM Re: My Travels in North East Scotland [Re: robbieroy]
robbieroy Online   content
Executive Member

Registered: 04/28/04
Posts: 2067
Loc: Scotland
The mercat cross stands right in front of the Townhouse. A medieval mercat cross in Scotland was the centre of the burgh. Not only did it demarcate the area of the market but it was also the place from where proclamations and news were announced and where
people were punished in a variety of different ways.



It was described in 1724 as having an image of the Virgin engraved on the north and south sides of the top of the cross as well as having coats of arms of the kings of Scotland and
bishops Dunbar, Stewart and Gordon. The image of the
Virgin had been defaced at the time of the Reformation in
1560 whilst a crucifix from the cross was destroyed at the
time of the Civil Wars in 1640.


When Old Aberdeen became a Burgh of Barony in the
late 15th century, it was required that a mercat cross should
be erected. It would seem from the fragment that survives
that this cross dates from some time about 1540.


The Council of Old Aberdeen sold the cross in 1788-9, but a fragment of the remains resurfaced in 1841 in a smithy in Old Aberdeen.


In 1951 this fragment was erected on top of a shaft in front of St Mary’s Church, High Street, by the University of Aberdeen. It was transferred back to its current and original location in 1993.






There are many beautiful residences in the area


Wrights’ and Coopers’ Place is named after one of the six
incorporated trades of Old Aberdeen – woodworkers and
barrel-makers. The Wrights and Coopers owned land here,
which was feued (or leased out) and led to the building of
this row of houses in the 19th century.




Houses with a history...








Edited by robbieroy (03/07/18 03:00 AM)
_________________________
RR


Top
#95796 - 03/08/18 03:03 AM Re: My Travels in North East Scotland [Re: robbieroy]
robbieroy Online   content
Executive Member

Registered: 04/28/04
Posts: 2067
Loc: Scotland
We are exploring the hidden history of the University quarter of Old Aberdeen...

We find ourselves amongst the historic houses and a hidden garden


We are approaching the garden - the MacRobert Memorial Garden
at the end of Wrights’ and Coopers’ Place.


King's College...

This commemorates Lady MacRobert, widow of Sir Alexander MacRobert Baronet, who had three sons. The first, Sir Alasdair, was accidentally killed flying his own aeroplane in 1938. His brother, Flight Lieutenant Sir Roderick MacRobert RAF, died over Mosul, Iraq, in May 1941.
Younger brother Pilot Officer Sir Iain MacRobert RAF died
over the North Sea on 30th June 1941.



On 10th October
1941, Lady MacRobert made a gift of a Short Stirling four engined bomber to the RAF, named ‘MacRobert’s Reply’.
Robert Hurd and Partners, the architects who restored Grant’s Place, also created the MacRobert Memorial Garden at the end of Wrights’ and Coopers’ Place.






This building is the townhouse of the family of McLean of Coll. The foundation stone of the house was laid in 1771. The McLean family were prominent in local affairs, with Hugh McLean being chief magistrate in Old Aberdeen in the late 18th century. One of the actions taken under him was the construction of the fine Townhouse that we see today in Old Aberdeen.


The wall in front of this building is made from Seaton bricks.


These, used extensively in Old Aberdeen, were produced locally at the Seaton Brick and Tile works, which was located a little to the south of the mouth of the river Don.


King's College...


Edited by robbieroy (03/08/18 03:19 AM)
_________________________
RR


Top
#95797 - 03/09/18 02:39 AM Re: My Travels in North East Scotland [Re: robbieroy]
robbieroy Online   content
Executive Member

Registered: 04/28/04
Posts: 2067
Loc: Scotland
As we continue travelling down High Street in Old Aberdeen we come to Elphintone Hall and King's College...

Looking at Kink's College Chapel from Elphinstone Hall


Elphinstone Hall was designed and built in 1930 by A. Marshall Mackenzie to take over the functions which the original Great Hall had performed before being demolished in 1870. It provides a large examination hall which can also be used for dining and recreational purposes, and a series of additional reception rooms. The Hall plays host to the University's graduation ceremonies.


It was constructed of sandstone (rather than the granite that characterises most buildings in Aberdeen). Stones were used from Castle Newe in Strathdon which was built in 1831 and demolished in 1927. The coats of arms above the arcade belong to some of the benefactors and local bodies.


When founded this was Scotland’s third University. With the exception of the chapel, little remains of the very first buildings on this site, which were grouped together as a quadrangle, the court of which remains.
The rear of the chapel


The chapel tower and crown
The closed crown at the top is an indication used by some renaissance princes to show that their authority in their lands was complete and not subject to a higher political power, namely the Holy Roman Emperor.


The present crown is a replacement, as the original was blown down in a storm in 1633.


The chapel went out of use at the time of the Reformation (but is in use today) and incorporates a number of unique pre-Reformation features such as its choir stalls.


The University and King's College of Aberdeen, is a formerly independent university founded in 1495


King's College was the first university in Aberdeen, the third in Scotland and the fifth in the British Isles.


In 1495, William Elphinstone, the relatively newly appointed Bishop of Aberdeen, petitioned Pope Alexander VI on behalf of King James IV to create the facility to cure the ignorance he had witnessed within his parish and in the north generally.



William Elphinstone and his tomb...


Edited by robbieroy (03/09/18 02:55 AM)
_________________________
RR


Top
#95798 - 03/10/18 03:14 AM Re: My Travels in North East Scotland [Re: robbieroy]
robbieroy Online   content
Executive Member

Registered: 04/28/04
Posts: 2067
Loc: Scotland
William Elphinstone lived from 1431 to 25 October 1514. He was a bishop, the founder of the University of Aberdeen, and a leading statesman in the courts of James III and James IV.
His tomb sits outside King's College Chapel.



The bronze and marble monument was designed by Henry Wilson and it used to be located within the Chapel in the 1920's. Due to issues with its size, the monument was eventually relocated to a site outside the Chapel in 1946.


William Elphinstone was born in Glasgow and educated at the University of Glasgow, graduating with an MA in 1452. He became a lawyer, and was later ordained as a priest, in 1465 becoming rector of St Michael's Church, in Glasgow's Trongate.


In 1469 he went to France, first as a student at the University of Paris and then as a lecturer at the University of Orleans. He returned to Scotland in 1473 and was made Rector of the University of Glasgow the following year. He was also given an ecclesiastical appointment at Glasgow Cathedral.


In 1483 he was appointed Bishop of Aberdeen, though not formally consecrated in that role until 1487.


Elphinstone was appointed Keeper of the Privy Seal of Scotland in 1492. Thereafter, and by now aged 61, Elphinstone seems to have turned his attention much more to the affairs of Aberdeen. In 1495 he arranged for Old Aberdeen, in which St Machar's Cathedral stood, to be made a burgh in its own right.


In the same year he wrote to Pope Alexander VI on behalf of King James IV asking for a university to be founded. It seems that James was keen to ensure that Scotland had as many universities as England at the time. The university grew up on a site close to St Machar's Cathedral, and at first was known as St Mary's College. The name rapidly changed to King's College, Aberdeen and its aim became to train doctors, teachers and clergy who would be able to serve the communities of northern Scotland, as well as lawyers and administrators for the Scottish Crown. It is now better known as the University of Aberdeen.


He was also partly responsible for the introduction of printing into Scotland. He died a year later in October 1514.





Powis Gate and the Snow Kirk....


Edited by robbieroy (03/10/18 03:24 AM)
_________________________
RR


Top
#95799 - 03/11/18 04:15 AM Re: My Travels in North East Scotland [Re: robbieroy]
robbieroy Online   content
Executive Member

Registered: 04/28/04
Posts: 2067
Loc: Scotland
The next section of our exploration of Old Aberdeen see us leave High Street and move on to College Bounds...



There is some hidden history I knew absolutely nothing about here. In the last photograph of the previous post you see twin towers, these form Powis Gates.

These gates, topped off by Turkish style minarets, were erected by John Leslie of Powis, 1833-4.


Powis House was built by John’s father, Hugh Leslie of Powis, in 1802. A shield carries a representation of black slaves commemorating their freedom on the family's Jamaican plantations.




The gates are topped by a crescent, which is the emblem of the Fraser family, who owned Powis estate prior to the Leslie family.


Powis Gates once served as the grand entrance to Powis House. Here is the gatehouse




A shield carries a representation of black slaves commemorating their freedom on the family's Jamaican plantations.

I hope you had a good week last week and have enjoyed the weekend. Although the Beast from the East has left us, this week's Sunday Snaps show some snowy scenes which serve as a reminder of the Beast.. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-43255373

The Snow Kirk and graveyard...


Edited by robbieroy (03/11/18 04:28 AM)
_________________________
RR


Top
#95801 - 03/12/18 03:58 AM Re: My Travels in North East Scotland [Re: robbieroy]
robbieroy Online   content
Executive Member

Registered: 04/28/04
Posts: 2067
Loc: Scotland
When I investigated this area of Old Aberdeen where the University of Aberdeen is located, the existence of the Snow Kirk was a complete surprise...

Originally called St Mary Ad Nives (of the Snows), this
was founded as the parish church when Old Aberdeen
became a Burgh of Barony.

This was its location


There is a graveyard associated with it but where was it?...

I had to follow a path.
The church went out of use at the time of the Protestant Reformation in 1560, although the building survived for the next hundred years or so.


Then I saw this old wrought iron gate.


On entering the gates I saw this...
Burials continued in the graveyard however; this was a problem for the Protestant authorities at the time as the burials here were of those who had a strong adherence to the old Catholic faith.


There are many old gravestones here


It contains gravestones dated between 1776 and 1902.


One of the flat grave markers is of Gilbert Menzies, a 17th century member of a very powerful local Catholic family.


It is a very small ground with no more than thirty or forty stones on view.






St Margaret’s Chapel and Convent...



Edited by robbieroy (03/12/18 04:24 AM)
_________________________
RR


Top
#95802 - 03/13/18 04:42 AM Re: My Travels in North East Scotland [Re: robbieroy]
robbieroy Online   content
Executive Member

Registered: 04/28/04
Posts: 2067
Loc: Scotland


We leave College Bounds in Old Aberdeen and the street now becomes The Spital.


I had no idea...
The Medieval St Peter’s Hospital gave the Spital Road and adjacent hills their names. This name is a shortening of hospital.


I wonder what is behind the wall?


This



Remaining buildings of great historic interest in the Spital are St Margaret’s Chapel and Convent, 17 Spital.


The Spital is hilly


12th century St Peter's Hospital was a hospice for retired Priests and was situated between Aberdeen and Old Aberdeen.






We did not quite reach the chapel and convent but we will tomorrow...
_________________________
RR


Top
#95803 - 03/14/18 03:19 AM Re: My Travels in North East Scotland [Re: robbieroy]
robbieroy Online   content
Executive Member

Registered: 04/28/04
Posts: 2067
Loc: Scotland


We are just about to leave the Spital and move on to King's Crescent. Soon after this, Old Aberdeen merges with Aberdeen. St Margaret's Convent and Chapel are found No 17, Spital and on the map above are shown by the red roofed buildings just off St Peter's Street.

The tall tower of St Martha’s (the altenative name for St Mrgaret's) (completed 1887) was built as a home for ‘Working Class Girls’


It is an imposing building situated well above street level


When Dr John Mason Neale (the founder of The Society of St Margaret at East Grinstead in Sussex) became Rector of St John’s Episcopal Church in Aberdeen, he and the Episcopalian Reverend John Comper felt there was a need in Aberdeen for a community like that in East Grinstead that would tend to the poor and sick.


“Built of granite, the tower-like east end, raised high on the Spital for the Sisters new home at Bayview is rooted in the Scottish vernacular tradition.


It was modelled on the 15th-century Kirk of the Holy Rood in Stirling”.


St Margaret’s Convent in the Spital has massive walls, rough- hewn, battering buttresses rising from foundations to parapet, and is roofed in red pantiles”.


The chapel of the convent (consecrated in 1892) was designed by Sir John Ninian Comper, son of the Reverend Comper. Sir Ninian Comper’s original plan for the buildings was only realised as far as one bay to the north of the chapel.


Other buildings on this site are a mixture of preexisting buildings and some built for the convent.


A closer look...





Edited by robbieroy (03/14/18 03:24 AM)
_________________________
RR


Top
#95804 - 03/15/18 03:54 AM Re: My Travels in North East Scotland [Re: robbieroy]
robbieroy Online   content
Executive Member

Registered: 04/28/04
Posts: 2067
Loc: Scotland
We are nearing the end of this hidden history of a part of Old Aberdeen. It has been interesting for me to uncover this history and I hope you have enjoyed it too.

We are having a closer look at St Margaret's Chapel and Convent...

The tall tower of St Martha’s (completed 1887)


In the Convent archives are the Convent House Diaries starting from 1863.


They contain fascinating little glimpses of the social conditions of the time and all that the clergy and Sisters had to contend with in building up the life of the church and parish.


There are constant references to visiting the sick and bereaved. Infant mortality was high and that of young adults from consumption equally so.


A Ragged school was established, clubs and classes for the boys, the women and girls, guilds for confirmation candidates, (40-50 presented at a time!)- Just think what that represents in terms of daily mission outreach and pastoral care.




Parish visiting and Sunday school work remained a feature of the Sisters contribution to the church, together with the provision of Retreats and Quiet Days in the beautiful Convent chapel in the Spital, built by Fr, Comper’s architect son, Sir Ninian.


_________________________
RR


Top
Page 140 of 151 < 1 2 138 139 140 141 142 150 151 >

Moderator:  MadridMan 
Welcome to the ALL SPAIN Message Board!
MadridMan's Live WebCam
Shout Box

Newest Members
Gypsy, CandianInSpain, b_zzzt, mariahbay, JaneJ
7745 Registered Users
Today's Birthdays
Grumpy in Orlando, vizione
Who's Online
0 registered (), 673 Guests and 7 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
MadridMan.com Base Menu

[greatMadridHotels.com]
[greatBarcelonaHotels.com]
Discounts on Madrid Hotels, Barcelona Hotels & Throughout Spain!

Other Martin Media Websites: GreatMadridHotels.com Hoteles-en-Madrid.com GreatBarcelonaHotels.com Hoteles-Barcelona.eu GreatSevilleHotels.com Hoteles-en-Sevilla.com GreatSpainHotels.com Avila Hotels Burgos Hotels Chipiona Hotels Cuenca Hotels Granada Hotels Huesca Hotels Jerez Hotels Oviedo Hotels Pamplona Hotels Ronda Hotels San Sebastian Hotels Santander Hotels Santiago De Compostela Hotels Segovia Hotels Valladolid Hotels Vitoria Hotels Zaragoza Hotels Spain Hostels Hostales BarcelonaMan.com BilbaoMan.com CadizMan.com CordobaMan.com GranadaMan.com MadridMan.com SantanderMan.com SantiagoMan.com SegoviaMan.com SevilleMan.com ToledoMan.com ValenciaMan.com Puerta del Sol Plaza Santa Ana Paseo del Prado El Faro de Moncloa Madrid Tours Madrid Apartments